At the nexus of learning and innovation
Sep
26
September 26, 5:00 pm
Where

Location: New Law School Annex Seminar Room 444, The University of Sydney

Cost: Free

RSVP: Not required

What will learning be like tomorrow? What are the frontiers of learning innovation that will drive this? How do developments in different disciplinary domains contribute to those frontiers? What kinds of research and development agendas should be pursued by researchers and innovators who work on those frontiers?

This seminar is a part of the Sydney Research Seminar series “Reimagining the future of learning innovation” and will focus on how developments in the EdTech industry will shape the frontiers of learning in higher education and beyond. It will be co-presented by Wes Sonnenreich Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Practera and David Collien, CTO and Co-Founder of OpenLearning. The presentations will be followed by Q&A discussion with students and general audience.  Everyone is welcome to attend!

Where

Location: New Law School Annex Seminar Room 444, The University of Sydney

Cost: Free

RSVP: Not required

Technology and Outcomes

Visualise cost, quality and scale as three axes on a triangular graph. If you had a scale of 1 student and could afford the best educator on the planet, you’d have the highest quality offering. Education institutions try to balance the triangle - finding the point in the middle where cost is affordable, scale is large enough to make the education accessible and quality is as high as possible.

The “holy grail” of Education Technology is to grow the size of the triangle. Increase revenue, increase quality, increase scale. But can we really do this? Every EdTech company claims to improve learning in some way, reduce costs or both. But what does that mean? Even without technology, measuring learning outcomes is challenging. Are we measuring the ability to regurgitate facts? Apply theory and practical know-how to a specific domain? Transfer knowledge to a new domain? Student satisfaction with the experience during or after or long after? Impact on employability? And what does cost reduction mean? Is it adding more students per educator or reducing educator headcount?

This presentation will explore how we have thought about these challenges at Practera, what we’ve done over the years that has worked and what hasn’t worked. We’ll refer to some of our recent research on how delivery format impacts quality (blended vs online) for experiential learning. We’ll then look at some trends in EdTech and discuss the opportunities and risks associated.

 

LX: Designing communities of knowing and showing 

OpenLearning was conceived and built around a very particular learning philosophy: to provide an online environment where learners are empowered to express themselves, experiences are intrinsically motivated, and passionate communities of practice flourish through well-designed constructive experiences. In contrast, conventional eLearning tools and practices have predominantly focussed on the delivery and individualisation of instructional content, eAssessement (quizzes), and similar methods for learners to acquire the information required to produce correct answers.

Throughout OpenLearning’s journey there has been a stand-out force which has helped to reconcile this tension: the role of the learner experience designer. The last decade has seen the professional field of “UX” (user experience) design evolve from the study of HCI (human-computer interaction), as well as “CX” (customer experience) which has formed from sales, marketing, and customer service roots. Continuing this trend and focussing on wider learner “experiences”, OpenLearning uses a professional “LX” (learner experience) philosophy, and develops LX as a sociotechnical system with new technology tools, patterns, and practices that ultimately change the way teaching and learning happens.

This session explores these motivations, the role of a LX designer, some of the processes, patterns, and the tools involved in LX design, and how LX can reveal the importance of investigating different kinds of knowledge, realise new value for learners and organisations from the kinds of knowledge artefacts which can be showcased, and can produce richer X-data (experience data) than is possible using conventional practices.