At the nexus of learning and innovation
Oct
08
October 8, 2:00 pm
Where

CoCo Lab

Level 2, Room 237

Education Building (a35)

8 October - Seminar with Jayne Lammers (University of Rochester) and Christian Ehret (McGill University)

Where

CoCo Lab

Level 2, Room 237

Education Building (a35)

Join us on October 8 for a special Learning and Innovation seminar with Jayne Lammers (University of Rochester) and Christian Ehret (McGill University).

Reading Young Adult Video Games as Young Adult Literature through Adolescents’ Livestreaming Literacies

Although Young Adult (YA) works are booming across media formats—from Stranger Things on Netflix to teen-authored Rookie posts and podcasts—cultural constructions of YA works often assume that they carry less artistic or literary value. Similarly, contemporary public discourse concerning adolescents’ experiences of livestreaming videogame play has been decried as detrimental to youth’s learning and development and even hailed as a public health crisis related to “screen time”. This talk questions such de-valuing discourses through a multimodal discourse analysis of adolescents’ (n=5) livestreaming their gameplay in an afterschool YA Games club. As a YA work, YA Video Games—or narrative games with youthful protagonists—face the double construction of “being YA” and “being a video game,” which is only compounded with the addition of livestreaming. Analysis focuses on the diminishing affects of these intersecting, cultural constructions of YA Game livestreaming on youths’ gaming experiences and therefore on their opportunities to learn and to read relevant, youthful narratives for pleasure through gaming. It further describes the relationship between participants’ emerging livestreaming literacies and the practices of reading YA Games as both player and spectator.

Christian Ehret is an Assistant Professor of English Education at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, Canada. Dr. Ehret’s research develops social theory to better account for the role of affect and emotion in processes of literacy learning and teaching, especially in relation to the global dynamics of sociotechnical change that challenge traditional ideas about what makes a human and about humans’ capacities to learn. His work has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Fonds de Recherche du Québec, and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). In 2016, he received NCTE’s Promising Researcher Award for his work alongside adolescents reading, writing, and making media during prolonged periods of hospitalization. His co-edited volume, with Kevin Leander, Affect in Literacy Learning and Teaching, was recently published by Routledge.

 

Layering a “Passionate Writer” Identity in Online Spaces: Learning from an Adolescent Writer Across Time and Space

This talk highlights Lammers’s work with Dr. Valerie Marsh as they conducted a longitudinal, instrumental case study with an adolescent writer, focusing on this young woman’s interest-driven digital writing practices. Qualitative data collected and analyzed using a grounded theory approach calls into question existing theoretical claims about identity fluidity, stability, and agency. Using “identity cube” as a theoretical construct, Lammers will illustrate how enduring elements of a writer’s identity and the contextual positioning that occurs when youth write for different audiences and purposes shape and layer their identity cubes. Findings suggest that adolescents approach writing with a durable core identity while flexibly laminating multiple sides of their identity cube, a reframing of identity that has implications for literacy-and-identity research.

Jayne C. Lammers is an Associate Professor of Education, Director of Secondary English teacher preparation, and Associate Director in the Center for Learning in the Digital Age at the University of Rochester’s Warner Graduate School of Education and Human Development. Currently on research leave as a Fulbright U.S. Scholar based in Semarang, Indonesia, Dr. Lammers’s research examines adolescents’ interest-driven digital literacies for the purpose of making classroom spaces more relevant for students and supporting teachers’ work with diverse and connected literacy learners.