At the nexus of learning and innovation

CRLI Research Fest Nov 29th -  roundtables

Online sign-up has closed but you can sign-up for available spaces at the registration desk on Fest day.

If rooms are full people who signed up will be given preference.

Please note each session, unless otherwise stated, has a limit of 50 due to room regulations.

SESSION 1: 12.50-1.35

  1. Teacher data literacy - LARG SIG with Dr Kathryn Bartimote, Prof Peter Reimann, Prof Jim Tognolini
  2. Collaborative research with communities and learning innovation – Prof Valerie Harwood
  3. Student’s shaping the learning experience: Student partnerships in higher-education – Student Partnership SIG with Courtney Hilton
  4. Making neuroscience accessible to teachers in schools - Neuroscience SIG with Dr Minkang Kim

SESSION 2: 1:40-2.25

  1. Higher Ed 2030 - the gathering storm – Prof Phil Poronnik, Prof David Cook
  2. Making Learning Less Lonely – Learning Spaces SIG with Dr Pippa Yeoman, Dr Stephanie Wilson
  3. AI for education: The last mile – Prof Peter Reimann, Prof Judy Kay, A/Prof Kalina Yacef
  4. Multimodal Analytics across Spaces: Towards Evidence-based Classroom Orchestration – Dr Roberto Maldonado, Natasha Arthars

 

1. Teacher data literacy: What, why, and how? Now and next.

  • Session 1: 12.50-1.35,  in room 106
  • Facilitator: Dr Kathryn Bartimote
  • Panellists: Prof Peter Reimann, Prof Jim Tognolini, Dr Shannon Kennedy-Clark (University of Notre Dame), Prof Adam Bridgeman

In this session, join with panellists in discussing teacher data literacy in both the K-12 and university contexts. We’ll consider definitions for both data and data literacy, why teachers and education leaders may wish to use data, and the various approaches panellists are taking to develop teacher data literacy. There will also be time to consider research horizons – what has been done to date, and what is needed next?

 

2. Collaborative research with communities and learning innovation

  • Session 1: 12.50-1.35, in room 100
  • Facilitator: Prof Valerie Harwood

In this roundtable we will be discussing how research collaborations with communities can contribute to learning innovation. Examples from Valerie’s recent Future Fellowship work will be discussed, as well as the new work being developed from the Community-Led Research Theme, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

 

3. Students shaping the learning experience: Student partnerships in higher-education

  • Session 1: 12.50-1.35, in room 102
  • Facilitator: Prof Pauline Ross/ Courtney Hilton

The predominant model in higher-education sees students as recipients of a learning experience that is designed and implemented by academic staff. Challenging this, there has been growing interest in the ways that students can become co-partners and co-designers in various aspects of learning and teaching, as well as more general university-life. In this roundtable, we discuss examples of this at the University of Sydney, and discuss reasons why these approaches can lead to better learning, and happier students.

 

4. Making neuroscience accessible to teachers in schools

  • Session 1: 12.50-1.35, room 117
  • Facilitator: Dr Minkang Kim

Currently, in many parts of the world, there are new initiatives to help serving teachers understand and apply the findings of neuroscientific research to classroom practice, especially in regard to teaching and learning. In this roundtable, members of the SIG who recently attended major conferences in London and Los Angeles will briefly report on some of the initiatives that are stating to help teachers enhance their classroom practices in the UK and USA. Discussion will then focus on what is necessary in Australia to assist teachers enhance their understanding of neuroscience and start to apply the sciences of brain and learning in their classrooms.

 

5. Higher Ed 2030 - the gathering storm

  • Session 2: 1.40-2.25, in room 100
  • Facilitators: Prof Pauline Ross, Prof Phil Poronnik

This roundtable will explore the gathering storm that is Higher Ed 2030, scanning the future and what our students will need and how we might deliver it.

 

6. Making Learning Less Lonely - LS SIG with Dr Pippa Yeoman, Dr Stephanie Wilson

  • Session 2: 1.40-2.25, in room 102
  • Organiser: Dr Pippa Yeoman
  • Facilitators: Dr Pippa Yeoman and Dr Stephanie Wilson

Learning communities be they place-based, online or somewhere in between are complex social and material structures. Vibrant ecologies of learning can appear to take on a life of their own but they are always sustained by the careful curation of key members. Finding ways to support this type of conviviality in formal settings is challenging. However, given the growing sense of isolation reported by students—49% did not feel a sense of belonging in their university community 56% did not interact with others outside of study requirements, and 49% did not interact with students who were very different from them (QUILT, 2018)—we cannot afford to turn away. This roundtable is an invitation to dialogue, drawing inspiration from a recent study conducted in the Abercrombie Building that resulted in a qualitative shift in human connection, it is an opportunity to think creatively about how to support connection in learning for cohorts marked by a growing sense of social alienation.

 

7. AI for education: The last mile

  • Session 2: 1.40-2.25, in room 106
  • Organiser: Prof Peter Reimann
  • Facilitators: Prof Peter Reimann, Prof Judy Kay, A/Prof Kalina Yacef

There is a lot being published about AI in Education in socio-economic terms, and from the algorithms and big data side, but we hear little about interface with the learners, teachers, and parents. This roundtable will explore and address AI for education, and how it may change the learning experience.

 

8. Multimodal Analytics across Spaces: Towards Evidence-based Classroom Orchestration

  • Session 2: 1.40-2.25, in room 117
  • Facilitators: Dr Roberto Maldonado, Natasha Arthars

Students’ learning is ubiquitous. It happens wherever the learner is rather than being constrained to a specific physical or digital learning space (e.g. the classroom or the institutional LMS respectively). A critical question is: what kinds of evidence would be critical to automatically collect to provide continued support for learning and teaching across physical and digital spaces? This round table will explore how multimodal learning analytics innovations can help to provide some answers to teachers' questions on students' learning seen through the lens of an emerging concept we call "Classroom Translucence".

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