At the nexus of learning and innovation

2017 CRLI ANNUAL REPORT

SCHOOL/DIVISION/CENTRE/UNIT

Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI)

YEAR OF REPORT

2017

SUMMARY OF MAIN ACTIVITIES AND ACHIEVEMENTS IN 2017

Established in 2016, the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation aims to provide a focus for the University’s cross-faculty research on learning, innovation and change—in formal education and also in workplace and community settings.

The primary goal is to create a worldleading centre for interdisciplinary research on learning and innovation: one capable of attracting and connecting outstanding researchers, to pioneer new methods for understanding and improving learning and its outcomes. The Centre aims to play a leading role, nationally and internationally, in developing research approaches and configuring research partnerships to strengthen the connections between research and its use. Simultaneously, it aims to provide an intellectual home for staff and research students interested in researching this area.

In 2017, the CRLI's work was led by the Centre’s Executive and Management Team, who were advised by the International Scientific Advisory Committee and reported to the Steering Committee. The Executive Team, consisting of two co-directors and a deputy director, provided strategic leadership and managed daily operations. They were assisted by the CRLI’s coordinator (returned from parental leave in Sep 2017) and 3 part-time postgraduate fellows. The Management Team, consisting of 15 academic staff members from FASS/SSESW, FEIT, Science, and Health Sciences, took leadership of specific areas of CRLI activity and relationships with major partners.

In 2017, the Centre continued to expand its activities across its three key strategic areas: 1) research capacity building, 2) research community building, and 3) research profile rising. Main achievements include:

Capacity building: Research projects

  1. Secured a Sydney Research Excellence Initiative (SREI 2020) grant for the project “Understanding and facilitating learning in emerging knowledge co-creation spaces” providing a boost for capacity building by creating opportunities to implement five collaborative seed projects involving 17 CRLI members. It also:
  1. created partnerships with external partners in health (HETI) and EdTech industry;
  2. strengthened international partnerships with 6 major research centres in the field;
  3. trialled a new approach for developing talent by awarding “top-up” scholarships for 5 capable HDR candidates to support their participation in the seed projects; and
  4. developed and piloted a set of new methodologies for analysing complex learning processes.

This work resulted in 4 ARC DP applications.

  1. Secured a new grant for a partnership project with the University of Edinburgh “Methodological innovations for assessing learning in digital spaces”.
  2. Secured two new University’s Strategic Education Grants for Sydney Research Seminars: “Investigating the social and neurobiological modulators of learning and wellbeing” and “Reimagining the future: Frontiers of learning innovation and research”.
  3. Overall in 2017, CRLI supported the start or continuation of work on 16 funded projects; and development of about 10 new projects, including 5 ARC proposals for funding starting in 2019 (4 ARC DP applications submitted).

Capacity building: Development

  1. CRLI and DVCE partnership has resulted in establishment of 0.5 FTE 3 year postgraduate fellow position to work on a new learning spaces project (started in March 2017).
  2. CRLI capacity building activities have focussed on the needs of university staff involved in educational innovation projects and on HDR education, and included a range of capacity building events (see below).
  3. CRLI ran a weekly in-semester research seminar series on Learning and Educational Innovation, attracting internal and external experts, and international visitors to present their research (23 seminars in total). The Centre has also co-presented capacity building workshops and two events with Sydney Ideas.
  4. CRLI provided a vibrant and supportive home for PhD students and ECRs, helping them develop as researchers and connecting them with the national and international research community. The CRLI/CoCo Lab, based in SSESW, was occupied by 24 post-graduate students and Postdocs. These HDR students were also involved in organising series of methodology workshops (3), reading groups (11), PhD colloquia (3) and weekly lab meetings.
  5. CRLI maintained and upgraded the Learning Research Design Studio (221.A35) with the ability to capture multiple video streams. This provided essential facilities for collecting videographic data for existing research projects and for new ARC Discovery applications.

Research community building

10. Over 2017, CRLI membership increased to over 300 staff and research students, of whom approximately 80 are external affiliate members, including PhD alumni.

11. Main research community building initiatives included the CRLIonline.net launch and the activities of 4 Special Interest Groups: Learning analytics, Learning spaces, Neuroscience and education, and the newly created Student partnership SIG. The SIGs work resulted in a number of influential internal and external events: winning a bid to host international Learning and Knowledge Analytic conference in 2018 (400+ anticipated participants); contribution to major strategic learning space development projects at the University, and the coordination of a University of Sydney team, acting as nominated consultants, on a request for tender for a major works panel to develop educational infrastructure for the NSW Department of Educationover the next 5 years in this area.

Research profile raising

12. CRLI hosted 14 international researchers during the year; 5 through the SREI grant and another 9 who were self-funded scholars and PhD interns. These scholars presented their recent research results in the CRLI Seminar Series, led reading group discussions, attended research meetings, consulted CRLI members working on current and planned ARC projects, as well as giving feedback to HDR students.

13. CRLI has started a new international partnership on a major Finish strategic project, “Developing mind”, led by the University of Helsinki

14. CRLI have developed and implemented a communication strategy to raise its profile and strengthen connections with stakeholders. A new website was launched in the mid-year; by year end it had 136 registered users with 120 unique pieces of content (including events, blog posts, case-studies etc). Other profile raising avenues included a mailing list, Yammer, Twitter, and various Sydney newsletters and calendars.

15. As a part of capacity building and profile raising, CRLI started a “White paper” initiative for providing expert opinion on emerging learning innovations and showcasing frontier research and development projects. The initial call for ideas resulted in 13 submissions, with first two ideas are being developed into white papers to be released in 2018.

MISSION STATEMENT

In January 2016 the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI), was formed from the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo) and the Sciences and Technologies of Learning (STL) research network.

This centre has strong roots in Education, with substantial involvement from Engineering & IT, Science, Health Sciences and Medicine. As with CoCo, membership of the centre is open to all members of university staff and postgraduate students with a serious interest in research in this area.

CRLI provides a focus for the university’s research on learning and innovation. In addition to conducting fundamental research on learning, the centre investigates educational innovation, including processes and structures which improve the connections between research on learning, sustainable educational innovation and the enhancement of learning outcomes. Its remit also includes researching processes of innovation and change outside formal education, whenever such change involves a significant element of individual, group, organisational or community learning. The centre thereby provides an intellectual home for all staff and students interested in researching learning, innovation and change—in formal education and also in workplace and community settings.

CRLI will help the University realise its aspirations to “be the leading, research-intensive university in Australia with outstanding researchers, networks and partnerships that improve the lives of our local and global communities”.

 

STAFFING AND ADMINISTRATION

EXECUTIVE TEAM

Co-directors:             Lina Markauskaite, Sydney School of Education and Social Work

                                 Peter Reimann, Sydney School of Education and Social Work

Deputy directors:      Abelardo Pardo, School of Electrical and Information Engineering at the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies

CRLI coordinator:    Sadhbh Warren, Sydney School of Education and Social Work

MANAGEMENT TEAM (Initial term)

Prof Janette Bobis, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2017)

Assoc Prof Rob Ellis, DVCE Portfolio (2017) (left Nov 17)

Prof Michael Jacobson, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2019)

Prof Judy Kay, School of Information Technologies at Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies (2016 - 2017)

Dr Minkang Kim, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2019)

Assoc Prof Lina Markauskaite, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2017)

Assoc Prof Abelardo Pardo, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies (2019) (leaving Jan 18)

Prof Phil Poronnik, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School (2016 - 2019)

Prof Peter Reimann, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2019)

Dr Jen Scott Curwood, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2019)

Assoc Prof Manjula Sharma, Faculty of Science (2016 - 2017)

Prof Tim Shaw, Faculty of Health Sciences (2016 - 2017)

Assoc Prof Alyson Simpson, Sydney School of Education and Social Work (2016 - 2017)

Incoming members for 2018

  1. Micah Goldwater, School of Psychology at the Faculty of Science
  2. Amani Bell, DVCE (Educational Innovation) portfolio
  3. Sharon Stephen, School of Mathematics and Statistics at the Faculty of Science
  4. Pippa Yeoman, Sydney School of Education and Social Work

STEERING COMMITTEE

The Steering Committee is chaired by the Head of School (or their nominee). It also includes: DVC Education and DVC Research (or their nominees) and one nominee from the dean of every faculty that has more than 10 members of the centre. The directors provide formal reports to this Steering Committee.

  1. Prof Dianne Mayer (Chair), Head of School and Dean, Sydney School of Education and Social Work
  2. Prof Michael Anderson, Sydney School of Education and Social Work
  3. Prof Inam Haq, Sydney Medical School
  4. Prof Duncan Ivison, DVCR
  5. Prof Pip Pattison, DVCE
  6. Prof Pauline Ross, Faculty of Science
  7. A/Prof Keith Willey Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies

SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The centre has a Scientific Advisory Committee, consisting of leading academics from the international research community. It includes members with current/recent experience of directing major research centres. Committee members are asked to provide feedback on the centre’s plans and progress and to help conduct periodic reviews.

  1. Professor Charles Crook, current director of LSRI (Learning Sciences Research Institute), University of Nottingham, UK
  2. Professor Dragan Gašević, Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, UK
  3. Professor Friedrich Hesse, Executive Director of the Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien and Head of the Knowledge Exchange Lab, Head of the Department for Applied Cognitive Psychology and Media Psychology at the University of Tuebingen, Germany
  4. Associate Professor Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, University of Southern California, USA
  5. Professor Yasmin Kafai, Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, past president of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), USA
  6. Associate Professor Yael Kali, Director of the Learning In a NetworKed Society (LINKS) Israeli Center of Research Excellence (I-CORE), Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Israel, Israel
  7. Professor Manu Kapur, Psychological Studies at The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
  8. Professor Nancy Law || Faculty of Education and Sciences of Learning Research Network, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  9. Professor Chee Kit Looi, research director, Learning Sciences Lab, National Institute of Education, Singapore
  10. Professor Monika Nerland, Department of Education, University of Oslo, Norway
  11. Professor Barbara Wasson, Director of the Centre for the Science of Learning & Technology (SLATE), University of Bergen, Norway
  12. Professor Carey Jewitt, Director of UCL Knowledge Lab, Institute of Education, UCL, UK   
  13. Professor Marcia Linn, Graduate School of Education, University of California at Berkeley, USA    USA
  14. Professor Patrick McAndrew, Director of the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) in The Open University, UK
  15. Professor Stephanie Teasley, Director of the Learning, Education & Design (LED) Lab, Research Professor, University of Michigan, USA

CRLI SIGs

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) provide a mechanism for researchers with shared interests to work together on projects and activities of mutual concern. See reports in the appendix for more information.

  1. Learning Analytics Research Group (joint with DVCE portfolio)
  2. Neuroscience and Education
  3. Innovative Learning Spaces
  4. Student Partnership SIG

CRLI on Social Media

Some of our platforms include:

  1. Website, including news, events listing, blog posts and links to seminar recordings – http://crlionline.net/
  2. University of Sydney Yammer group at http://bit.ly/CRLIyammer 
  3. Twitter account at @CRLI_Usyd https://twitter.com/CRLI_Usyd 
  4. CRLI Research centre YouTube channel at

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFp2axvT2m-RVeODHDUE93Q

Visiting Scholars in 2017

CRLI invited key international scholars from leading centres to collaborate on its project “Understanding and Facilitating Learning in Emerging Knowledge Co-Creation Spaces”, funded under the Sydney Research Excellence Initiative SREI 2020 scheme at the University of Sydney, and present a series of lectures, seminars and workshops.

  1. Prof Nancy Law, University of Hong Kong. Founding Director and current Deputy Director of the Centre for Information Technology in Education. August 2017
  2. Prof Patrick Oliver, Newcastle University, Open Lab, UK. Founder and leader of Open Lab and the Principal Investigator and Co-Director of the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics. October 2017
  3. Prof Bill Penuel, University of Colorado Boulder, US. November 2017
  4. Prof Allison Littlejohn, Open University, UK. Academic Director of Learning and Teaching. November 2017
  5. A/Prof Crina Damsa, University of Oslo, Norway. November 2017

Other international visitors included:

  1. Roland Hachmann, PhD student and Associate Professor in ICT and learning, University College South Denmark, Denmark. May-August 2017
  2. Dr. Ping He, Lecturer, Tianjing University, China. March 2016 – February 2017
  3. Dr Maria Souza e Silva, Associate Professor, University of Brasília, Brazil. July 2016 – July 2017
  4. A/Professor Csaba Veres, Department of Information Science and Media Studies, University of Bergen, Norway. May 2017
  5. A/Professor Santi Caballe, Open University of Catalonia, Spain. May-July 2017
  6. Susan Sun, School of Language and Culture, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, November 2017
  7. Professor Thomas Carey, Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education, San Diego State University, USA. September 2017
  8. Professor David Williamson Shaffer, University of Wisconsin-Madison, US. November 2017
  9. Professor Gráinne Conole, Dublin City University, Ireland. November 2017

10. Professor Roger Säljö, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Planned for February 2018

MAIN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS IN 2017

  1. Growing mind: Educational transformations for facilitating sustainable personal, social, and institutional renewal at the digital age, led by Prof Kai Hakkarainen, University of Helsinki, funded by the Academy of Finland, 2018-2022
  2. Designing for situated knowledge in a world of change, led by Prof Nina Bonderup Dohn, The University of Southern Denmark, funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research, 2016-2019

APPENDIX ONE: SREI 2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT: SUMMARY

Understanding and Facilitating Learning in Emerging Knowledge Co-Creation Spaces is a one year research project of the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation. It is funded under the Sydney Research Excellence Initiative – 'SREI 2020'.

The purpose of the project is to build on partnerships of researchers from the learning sciences, IT, health and medical sciences and other disciplines to explore ‘knowledge co-creation’, as a phenomenon that crosses learning and innovation. The approach adopted in this project couples expansion of research leadership capacities and international collaboration with the testing of innovative and ambitious approaches for feeding CRLI research into practice and achieving impact via knowledge co-creation.

The overall project is led by Lina Markauskaite and Peter Reimann. Six themes include the following members (theme leader in bold):

Theme 1 – Tim Shaw, Lina Markauskaite, Judy Kay, Rafael Calvo, Peter Goodyear

Theme 2 – Peter Reimann, Abelardo Pardo, Michael Jacobson, Judy Kay

Theme 3 – Janette Bobis, Louise Sutherland, Way, Curwood

Theme 4 – Kathryn Baltimore-Aufflick, Abelardo Pardo, Kalina Yacef, Irina Koprinska. Philip Poronnik

Theme 5 – Alyson Simpson, Lina Markauskaite, Peter Goodyear, Philip Poronnik

Theme 6 – Peter Reimann, Kalina Yacef, Irina Koprinska

Achievements

In ten months, the project has achieved a range of outcomes in terms of capacity building, mentoring and local and international collaboration as well as through the development of infrastructure for future CRLI research.

“Top up” scholarships were awarded to five postgraduate students. These students have a key role to play in gathering and analysing data within each theme and are mentored in their role by the Theme leader. The students are: Theme 1 – Courtney Hilton; Theme 3 – Kathrin Cartwright; Theme 4 – Puji Rahayu; Theme 5 – Tingjia Wang; Theme 6 – Billy Chen

Five international scholars visited the University of Sydney in 2017. Roger Säljö will visit in February 2018.

A series of events have occurred, including open ‘data-shops’, individual consultations and meetings with project members, university staff and students, and international scholars as well as seminars and lectures, as follows:

  1. 9 August 2017, Joint presentation with Nancy Law and Louise Sutherland, Knowledge Co-Creation in School-University Partnerships.
  2. 10 August 2017, Education and Social Work Dean’s Lecture Series with Nancy Law, Education Professionals Need A Language for Learning Design.
  3. 25 October 2017, CRLI Seminar with Patrick Olivier, Digital Civics and Digital Learning.
  4. 9 November 2017, Joint Workshop with Allison Littlejohn and David Shaffer, Professional Knowledge, Skills and Identity.
  5. 14 November 2017, Seminar with Bill Penuel, From a Few Classrooms to Many – Expanding Design Research to Support Organizational Change.
  6. 14 November 2017, Workshop with William Penuel, Organizing Collaborative Design Teams in DBIR.
  7. 15 November 2017, Education and Social Work Dean’s Lecture Series with William Penuel, Research-Practice Partnerships as a Strategy for Developing and Using Evidence in Policy and Practice.
  8. 6 December 2017, CRLI Seminar with Crina Damsa, A micro-level perspective to learning ecologies – Student engagement and learning designs in higher education.
  9. 7 December 2017, Joint presentation with Crina Damsa, Alyson Simpson and Tingjia Wang, From tacit to explicit knowledge construction: methodologies for exploring dialogic materiality in pre-service teacher education.

Collaboration and partnerships

Several partnerships and new projects have emerged as a results of this project, including:

  1. A partnership with Health Education and Training Institute NSW
  2. A partnership with the Meetup Instructional Design & eLearning community
  3. Collaboration between Phil Poronnik (The University of Sydney) and Patrick Olivier (Newcastle University, UK) on a new project for redeveloping Human Biology, a first year large scale unit of study.

Web development

  1. The project’s home page can be accessed from http://crlionline.net/knowledge-co-creation
  2. The project also developed a platform for matching requests-for-research opportunities with offers to conduct research in an authentic setting. This platform will soon undergo testing with the University of Sydney staff and students.

 

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS AND SIG REPORTS

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) provide a mechanism for researchers with shared interests to work together on projects and activities of mutual concern. They are primary sites for community-building and for the development of research expertise. Among other things, they create methodological, theoretical and other resources for CRLI as a whole.

SIGs recognised in 2017

  1. Innovative Learning Spaces
  2. Learning Analytics Research Group (joint with DVCE portfolio)
  3. Neuroscience and Education
  4. Student Partnership

 

Learning spaces SIG annual report 2017

Co-convenors: Dr Pippa Yeoman and Dr Stephanie Wilson

Membership 2017: 38 (55% HE, 21% Schools and 21% commercial design)

Membership 2016: 34 (67% HE, 18% Schools and 15% commercial design)

Funding to support research

The Abercrombie Living Learning Laboratory project

During 2017 Pippa Yeoman and Stephanie Wilson developed a proposal to (1) study the impact of alterations in furniture on teaching and learning practice, (2) a methodology to pilot new spatial configurations for learning that could be used in subsequent work with Campus Infrastructure Services (CIS), and (3) engage staff in extending their repertoires of innovative task design in response to altered spatial affordances. The SIG has been awarded funding to refurnish a seminar room in the Abercrombie building, funded by Educational Innovation in Business. Research will commence in 2018.

Potential project with the ActiveSpaces Collaboration

ActiveSpaces is a group of researchers, practitioners and policy makers who believe active spaces can make a difference to our health. It is co-ordinated by Dr Lina Engelen, from the School of Public Health at the University of Sydney, who approached Stephanie and Pippa in November, to explore the possibility of running a small learning space project together. The group is currently look for funding sources.

Cross faculty collaboration and industry engagement

  1. Interest in space for learning brings people together from across disciplines and provides easy bridges between educators, researchers and design professionals working in a number of industries. This is reflected in our membership and the types of collaborations that have developed over less than eighteen months, and most of what we do in the SIG falls under this banner. In addition to the work of the SIG, members have been involved in a number of space-based collaborative endeavours during 2017:
  2. P. Yeoman invited to participate, as an expert in learning spaces, on a project involving eight ACT primary schools. Academic collaborators include Prof P. Freebody, Prof P. Reimann (Sydney), Dr K. Thompson (Griffith, QLD) and Dr S. Howard (Wollongong, NSW).
  3. P. Yeoman was invited by HDR Architects to co-ordinate a University of Sydney team, acting as nominated consultants, on a request for tender for a major works panel to develop educational infrastructure for the NSW Department of Education.
  4. P. Yeoman, M. Phelps, T. Hinton, J. Catling, A. Matovic and P. Poronnick participated in more than 35 user groups for the Westmead Education Conference Centre (WECC) upgrade, and the Central Acute Services Building (CASB) Westmead Campus Project at The University of Sydney.
  5. T. Hinton, P. Yeoman, & M. Phelps assisted with the initial training/handover of the Westmead ECC in August and September. The aim was to ensure that those using the spaces understood the educational design intentions of the eight different space types.
  6. P. Yeoman was invited to participate in a workshop for the design of the Chau Chak Wing Museum at The University of Sydney.
  7. P. Yeoman was invited to act as an educational consultant on the refurbishment of four NSW high schools, with Diane Jones, Executive Director of PTW Architecture.
  8. P. Yeoman continues to act as lead juror for the Learning Environments Australasia annual design awards, in the award categories of: educational innovation; and renovation over $2 million.

Events and course development

Visit to Living Edge, hosted by Herman Miller (4th April, eight in attendance)

The aim of the visit was to see HM’s new ibecon application in use. Passport offers information about space utilisation and can be customised to include information about suggested forms of use. The visit lead to offer, by Herman Miller, to run a pilot at the University of Sydney out at Westmead, which is exciting but sorting out ethics has proved more difficult than expected due to the complexity of the Westmead Education Conference Centre (WECC) being owned by the Western Sydney Local Heath District. The idea is that once we have ethics we will involve members of the SIG in thinking about how the types of information Passport can provide would be helpful in terms of future instructional and architectural design.

Using open, collaborative learning spaces well: Connecting space with learning tasks and social interaction (16th August, 42 in attendance)

A very successful workshop facilitated by Stephanie Wilson in the University of Sydney Business School. Guest speakers included Associate Professor Stefan Meisiek, Tony Cannell, and Jimmy Northwood talking about adapting their teaching and learning practices to their new learning spaces. This was followed by a design challenge in which groups used a methodology being developed by Pippa Yeoman to connect learning theory with architectural and instructional design.

Professional development in the Sydney Business School

A session on learning spaces has been developed by Stephanie Wilson and embedded in The University of Sydney Business School’s Tutor Development Program. This is a core component, run every semester, for up to 120 tutors. Following its initial success, the session has been adapted for advanced facilitation workshops available to both tutors and academics in the School.

Pencast video on using space for learning

Stephanie developed a Pencast video on the use of space in teaching, in the Abercrombie building.

Communication & dissemination

Book contract with Routledge

Lucila Carvalho and Pippa Yeoman secured a contract with Routledge to co-author a book entitled Learning to teach in innovative spaces: A toolkit for action, to be published next year.

Podcast

Pippa Yeoman was interviewed in an episode of the University of Sydney Business School podcast series Learning Connections. The aim of the podcast was to share both research and practical strategies to support academic staff in thinking about the relationships between space and other aspects of the teaching environment.

Publications

Book chapters

Hinton, T., Yeoman, P., Ashor, L., & Poronnik, P. (2017). Spaces enabling change: X-lab and science education 2020. In L. Carvalho, P. Goodyear, & M. de Laat (Eds.), Place-based spaces for networked learning (pp. 206-224). New York, NY: Routledge.

Yeoman, P. (2017). A study in improvisation, in the design and use of complex networked learning environments. In L. Carvalho, P. Goodyear, & M. de Laat (Eds.), Place-based spaces for networked learning (pp. 41-59). New York, NY: Routledge.

Conference presentations

Ashor, L. K., Hinton, T., Poronnik, P., & Yeoman, P. (2017, July). Experimenting with science and engineering teaching laboratory design. Workshop session at the 52nd meeting of The Society for College and University Planning (SCUP). Washington, DC.

Carvalho, L., & Yeoman, P. (December, 2017). A toolkit for action: Translating theory into practice. In Chen, W. et al. (Eds.). Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Computers in Education (ICCE) Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education. Christchurch, New Zealand.

Hod, Y., Eberle, J., Benishou, M., Charles, E., Cress, U., Fischer, F., Goodyear, P., Kali, K., Kollar, I., Thompson, K., Tjietjen, P., & Yeoman, P. (2017, June). Synthesizing CSCL perspectives on the theory, methods, design, and implementation of future learning spaces. Workshop session at the International Society of the Learning Sciences 12th conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL). Philadelphia, PA.

Yeoman, P., & Spinetti, S. (2017, November) STEAM, Technologies and Contemporary Learning Environments: Connecting students with support for STEAM projects. Symposium at the Australian Association for Research in Education Conference (AARE). Canberra, Australia.

Yeoman, P., & Carvalho, L. (2017, September) Learning to teach in innovative spaces. The 24th Annual Conference of the Association for Learning Technology (ALT). Liverpool, England.

Yeoman, P., & Phelps, M. (2017, August). If you could see what I can see: The professional and interdisciplinary challenges of designing spaces for learning. The 17th Biennial conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI). Tampere, Finland

Invited seminars and workshops

Thompson, K., & Yeoman, P. (2017, November). The collaborative design of STEAM Units of Work. A workshop hosted by the Creative Practice Lab. Griffith University, Queensland.

Thompson, K., & Yeoman, P. (2017, November). Designing evidence-based practice. A workshop hosted by the Creative Practice Lab. Griffith University, Queensland.

Yeoman, P. (2017, November). I want to understand what makes complex learning environments sing. An invited presentation, hosted by the Creative Practice Lab. Griffith University, Queensland.

Yeoman, P., & Wilson S. (2017, August). Using open, collaborative learning spaces well: Connecting space with learning tasks and social interaction. A workshop hosted by the Centre for Research on learning and innovation, Learning Spaces SIG and the University of Sydney Business School.

Yeoman, P. (2017, August). Opportunities for teaching and learning in the new WECC. The University of Sydney’s Westmead Forum, The University of Sydney, Westmead, Australia.

Yeoman, P., & Phelps, M. (2017, July). Embracing the challenges of designing and using complex learning environments. A Technological innovations and clinical applications seminar hosted by the University of Sydney, Westmead, Australia.

 

CRLI SIG Report 2017: Learning Analytics SIG

Co-convenors: A/Prof Abelardo Pardo and Dr Kathryn Bartimote

Membership: Informal, around 50 staff and students from across the University

Research presentations

During 2017 there were two research presentations embedded in the context of the CRLI seminar related to the activities of the SIG; one presented by Dr Kathryn Bartimote and a second one by A/Prof Abelardo Pardo.

Bill Penuel’s visit coordination

Bill Penuel’s visit was organised and coordinated to promote the study of connection between design-based research in educational environments and the role of learning analytics.

Design of a workshop as part of Theme 4 of the SREI

In collaboration with A/Prof Irena Koprinska, A/Prof Kalina Yacef and Prof Phil Poronnik, the group has designed a workshop to study how knowledge co-creation emerges from discussions among academics and data experts around information and visualisations derived from university-held student information. The workshop is in its final stages of design and pending the application for ethics approval. It will take place in Q1 2018.

Articulation of access to University-held student data for research purposes

Dr Kathryn Bartimote has been leading the deployment of a governance and policy structure to provide a structure to the use of university-held student data for the purpose of both teaching and research. This task has advanced significantly during 2017 and the data is now being made available to academics. The SIG plans to serve as the vehicle to promote the use of data for solid research initiatives through the organisation of meetings and workshops covering from how to access the data to suggested research problems to tackle.

Organisation of the 2018 edition of LAK

The SIG has assumed the organising role of the 2018 edition of the International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge. The organisers expect around 400 delegates coming from all over the world. This edition hosted by The University of Sydney is the first one to convene a meeting with stakeholders in the K-12 space, and accept extended abstract submissions as activities geared towards widening the scope of the society. Additionally, the group has convened a leadership summit to discuss the challenges preventing the area of Learning Analytics to have a substantial contribution to the quality of the student experience.

 

CRLI SIG Report 2017: Neuroscience and Education SIG

Convenor: Dr. Minkang Kim (Convenor, FASS)

Membership: 21: 16 from the University, 5 from industry, schools and other universities

The SIG has three key aims:

  1. To develop a strong empirical research program on neuroscience and education in Sydney.
  2. To network across other centres of excellence in neuroscience and education in Australia and overseas 
  3. To disseminate research findings into the wider educational community.

Summary of key activities and achievements in 2017

Members of the SIG have published high-quality empirical papers (see listed below).

Inter-faculty network and collaborations strengthened, secured collaborative Strategic Education Grant proposal.

The SIG has started to develop a project on Values Education in Independent Schools in NSW. Mr. Chris Duncan, the Division Head of the Association of Independent School of New South Wales (AISNSW) has joined the SIG and enrolled for a PhD degree. This project will involve multi-level data collection from distinctive independent schools in NSW, which includes EEG data.

2017 Grants

  1. FASS Research Support Scheme 2017, The development of justice sensitivity: A research approach through educational neuroscience.
  2. China Studies Centre’s Research Grant: Moral minds: Insights from neuroscience and Chinese philosophy.
  3. Strategic Education Grant, Sydney Research Seminar Scheme, Investigating the social and neurobiological modulators of learning and wellbeing.

2017 Selected highlighted publications

Davis, T., Goldwater, M., Giron, J. (2017). From Concrete Examples to Abstract Relations: The Rostrolateral Prefrontal Cortex Integrates Novel Examples into Relational Categories. Cerebral Cortex, 27(4), 2652-2670.

Goldwater, M. (2017). Grammatical Constructions as Relational Categories. Topics in Cognitive Science, 9(3), 776-799.

Jacobson, M., Markauskaite, L., Portolese, A., Kapur, M., Lai, P., Roberts, G. (2017). Designs for learning about climate change as a complex system. Learning and Instruction, 52, 1-14.

Kim, M., & Sankey, D. (2017). Philosophy, neuroscience and pre-service teachers' beliefs in neuromyths: A call for remedial action. Educational Philosophy and Theory, Online first.

Lai, P., Portolese, A., Jacobson, M. (2017). Does sequence matter? Productive failure and designing online authentic learning for process engineering. British Journal of Educational Technology, Online first.

Sankey, D. (2017). The neurobiology of trust and schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory. Online first

 

CRLI SIG Report 2017: Student partnerships

Co-convenors: Professor Peter Reimann and Dr Amani Bell

Membership: Informal, around 40 staff and students from across the University

This SIG focuses on aspects of student partnerships and student-assisted learning that are of particular importance at the University of Sydney. Our focus is on the role student partnerships can play in the context of interdisciplinary learning, and how students can get involved in the design of new learning spaces and learning technologies that support peer-assisted learning, in addition to teacher-led learning. A further research theme is the development of skills and competences for peer tutoring and for peer group facilitation, and the relation of these competences to more general graduate qualities.

Summary of key achievements in 2017

The SIG held three meetings:

  1. An introductory meeting on 23 March, where Dr Amani Bell discussed some of the models and principles for working in partnership with students, and an informal discussion about various initiatives at the University. (33 registrations)
  2. Dr Wendy Green, UTAS, presented on 23 June on her OLT Fellowship on engaging students as partners in global learning. (32 registrations)
  3. Professor Patrick Olivier, presented on 24 October about the work of the Open Lab at Newcastle University, followed by presentations about four University of Sydney partnership projects.  (42 registrations)

We set up a webpage http://crlionline.net/student-partnerships which we are currently populating with content, and are also producing a short video to promote the SIG. We have also promoted SIG activities via the Teaching@Sydney blog / newsletter, which reaches over 5,000 staff, and via Twitter #studentsaspartners

2017 Selected highlighted publications and presentations

  1. Bell, A., Peseta, T., Barahona, S., Jeong, S., Lan, L., Menzies, R., Trieu, T., & Wen, A. (2017). In Conversation Together: Student Ambassadors for Cultural Competence. Teaching and Learning Together in Higher Education, 21, 1-8.
  2. Bell, A., Barahona, S., Beg, G., Coulson, S., Eymont, R., Hartman, J., Hubble, T., Leung, N., McDonnell, M., Ni, J., Peseta, T., Sakhaee, E., & Uptin, J. (2017). Curriculum transformation for cultural competence: Students and academics working in partnership to embed a new graduate quality. Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Conference, Sydney, 28-30 June.
  3. Bell, A. & Peseta, T. (2017). Mapping the discursive and political orientations of Students as Partners initiatives in higher education, Australian Association for Research in Education Conference, Canberra, 27-30 November.
  4. Hartman, J. (2017). Students as partners for cultural competence. National Students as partners Roundtable, The University of Adelaide, 9th October.
  5. Johinke, R., & Sakhaee, E. (2017). LEO: an emerging initiative in student leadership. Students Transitions Achievement Retention & Success Conference, Adelaide, 2-5 July.
  6. Stanway, B., Cao, S., Gu, J., & Cannell, T (2017). University of Sydney Business School: Building a cross-cultural bridge to Chinese international students, using WeChat. Engaging students as partners in global learning National Learning and Teaching Fellowship Symposium, University of Tasmania, 9th October.

 

APPENDIX TWO: SELECTION OF GRANTS ACTIVE IN 2017-2018

  1. Understanding and facilitating learning in emerging knowledge co-creation spaces; Markauskaite L, Reimann P, Goodyear P, Pardo A, Kay J, Shaw T, Poronnik P, Bobis J, Way J, Simpson A, Sutherland L, Curwood J, Jacobson M, Bartimote-Aufflick K, Yacef K, Koprinska I, Calvo R; DVC Research/Sydney Research Excellence Initiative 2020 (SREI).
  2. Enhancing workplace learning through mobile technology, Trede F (CSU), Tayebjee F (UWS), Macfarlane S (Deakin), Goodyear P (Sydney), Markauskaite L (Sydney), Office for Learning and Teaching, Australian Government. Innovation and development scheme
  3. Scaling the provision of personalised learning support actions for large student cohorts; Pardo A, Dawson S, Shum S, Siemens G, Gasevic D, Schulte J, Martinez Maldonado R, Mirriahi N, Vigentini L, Bartimote-Aufflick K, McIntyre S; Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT)/OLT Grants.
  4. Agent-based virtual learning environments for understanding science: Jacobson, M; Richards, D; Taylor, C; Sutherland, L; Kapur, M. ARC, 2015-2017
  5. Solving the inert knowledge problem: Goldwater, M; Jacobson, M; Livesey, E. ARC, 2015-2017
  6. Modelling complex learning spaces: Ellis R, Goodyear P, Fisher K, Marmot A. ARC, 2015-2019
  7. Cross faculty industry and community partnership project: What will you do when you grow up, with Randstad, Markauskaite L, Reimann P.
  8. Spread the data! Learning new forms of interactive data communication (Open Learning Environment—HDR); Reimann P, Simpson A, Wilson R, Markauskaite L; DVC Education/Large Educational Innovation Grant.
  9. Methodological innovations for assessing learning in digital spaces. Scott Curwood J, Gasevic D, Bell A, Pardo A, & Ross J. Source: University of Sydney and University of Edinburgh Partnership Collaboration Award.
  10. Student leadership open learning environment: Lewis S, Shirley D, Bell A, Lincoln M, Sakhaee E, Johinke R, Burgess A. Source: University of Sydney Education Innovation grant.
  11. The development of justice sensitivity: A research approach through educational neuroscience. FASS Research Support Scheme.  
  12. Moral minds: Insights from neuroscience and Chinese philosophy. China Studies Centre’s Research Grant.
  13. Re-imagining the future: Frontiers of learning innovation and research. 2018 Strategic Education Grant (Sydney Research Seminars). Markauskaite L, Reimann P, Pardo A, Bell A, Ellis R.
  14. Investigating the social and neurobiological comodulators of learning and wellbeing. 2018 Strategic Education Grant (Sydney Research Seminars). Minkang K, Hickie I, Porronik P.

 

APPENDIX THREE: EVENTS HOSTED BY CRLI IN 2017

Special events and workshops

May 12 workshop - Becoming a super researcher: using technology to do your research more effectively with Courtney Hilton, CRLI Postgraduate Fellow

May 19 workshop - How to develop and assess students’ competences for group learning and teamwork with Professor Peter Reimann, co-director, CRLI

9 Aug – Joint SREI presentation with Nancy Law (HKU) and Louise Sutherland (Sydney), Knowledge Co-Creation in School-University Partnerships.

10 Aug - Education professionals need a language for learning design with Professor Nancy Law, co-hosted by Sydney Ideas and SSESW Dean's Lecture Series

9 Nov - Special event workshop on knowledge, skills and identity with Professors Allison Littlejohn (OU, UK) and David Williamson Shaffer (Winconsin)

14 Nov - Design-based implementation research (DBIR) seminar and workshop with Professor Bill Penuel (Boulder)

15 Nov - Research-Practice Partnerships as a Strategy for Developing and Using Evidence in Policy and Practice with Professor Bill Penuel, co-hosted by Sydney Ideas and SSESW Dean's Lecture Series

29 Nov - Learning Design workshop with Professor Gráinne Conole (Dublin City University)

7 Dec - Joint presentation with Crina Damsa (Oslo), Alyson Simpson and Tingjia Wang, “From tacit to explicit knowledge construction: methodologies for exploring dialogic materiality in pre-service teacher education”.           

 

CRLI Seminar Series

April 12: Teacher data literacy: what does it mean, how can it be developed? - Professor Peter Reimann, co-director, CRLI

April 26: Exploring real-time motivation and engagement in mathematics and English - Professor Andrew Martin, School of Education, UNSW Arts & Social Sciences

May 3: Making connections in STEAM education - Dr Kate Thompson, School of Education and Professional Studies, Griffith University

May 10: Reflective writing analytics at the Connected Intelligence Centre - Dr Andrew Gibson, Connected Intelligence Centre, University of Technology, Sydney

May 17: Linked data in an education app, A/Professor Csaba Veres, Department of Information Science and Media Studies, University of Bergen, Norway

May 24: Intelligent virtual agents for education, training and health, Professor Deborah Richards, Department of Computing, Macquarie University

May 31: Beyond disciplines: exploring the relationship between academics’ epistemic stances and culture, Dr Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick, co-chair, Learning Analytics special interest group, CRLI

June 7: Using data to promote student engagement, A/Professor Abelardo Pardo director, Learning and Affect Technologies Engineering research laboratory, The University of Sydney

June 14: Innovative methodologies for computer-supported collaborative learning, A/Professor Santi Caballe, Open University of Catalonia, Spain

June 21: The future of assessment, Dr Rachel Wilson, senior lecturer in research methodology, educational assessment and evaluation, SSESW

June 28: Assessment in the 21st century: what is real and what is stereotype? - Dr Maria Souza e Silva, Associate Professor , University of Brasília, Brazil

July 5: Online support for teachers: theory, design and impact - Dr Nick Kelly, Senior Research Fellow, Queensland University of Technology, and Steven Kickbusch, learning design consultant

August 2: Designs for transformation of situated knowledge -Roland Hachmann, senior lecturer in ICT and learning, University College South Denmark

August 9: Supporting families with young children at risk: a cultural-historical perspective - Associate Professor Nick Hopwood, UTS School of Education

August 16: A professor meets the elevator pitch - Professor Michael Jacobson, chair of education in SSESW

September 6: Journeying in the foothills: neuroscience, moral values and education - Dr Derek Sankey, honorary associate in SSESW

September 20: “Engaging Effectively with Innovation” as a graduate quality - Dr Thomas Carey, associate research professor in teacher education, Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education at San Diego State University

October 4: Using learning design and LAMS to implement team-based learning: an example from medical education - Professor James Dalziel, Dean of Education, Morling College, Macquarie Park

October 18: Design for computer-assisted language learning - Susan Sun, School of Language and Culture, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

October 25: Using social and ubiquitous computing to enhance education, health and well-being - Professor Patrick Olivier, School of Computing, Newcastle University, UK

November 8: Quantitative ethnography: human science in the age of big data - Professor David Williamson Shaffer, University of Wisconsin-Madison, US

November 14: From a Few Classrooms to Many – Expanding Design Research to Support Organizational Change - Professor Bill Penuel, University of Colorado Boulder, US.

December 6: A micro-level perspective to learning ecologies – Student engagement and learning designs in higher education - A/Professor Crina Damsa, University of Oslo, Norway.

 

APPENDIX FOUR: SELECTED PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS NOT LISTED ELSEWHERE

Books

  1. Burnett, C., Merchant, G., Simpson, A., Walsh, M. (2017). The case of the iPad: Mobile literacies in education. Springer.
  2. Carvalho, L., Goodyear, P., de Laat, M. (Eds.) (2017). Place-based spaces for networked learning. New York: Routledge.
  3. Fischer, F., Goldwin, S., Hmelo-Silver, C., & Reimann, P. (Eds.). (In press). International handbook of the learning sciences. New York: Routledge.
  4. Markauskaite, L., Goodyear, P. (2017). Epistemic fluency and professional education: Innovation, knowledgeable action and actionable knowledge. Dordrecht: Springer. Dordrecht: Springer.
  5. Trede, F., Markauskaite, L., McEwen, C., Macfarlane, S. (In press). Education for practice in hybrid spaces: Enhancing professional learning with mobile technology. Springer.

Book chapters

  1. Bartimote-Aufflick, K., Reimann, P., & Pardo, A. (In press). The perspective realism brings to learning analytics in the classroom. In J. M. Lodge, J. Cooney Horvath, & L. Corrin (Eds.), Learning analytics in the classroom: translating learning analytics research for teachers. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis.
  2. Bliuc, A., Goodyear, P., Ellis, R. (2017). The role of students' social identities in fostering high-quality learning in higher education.  In Kenneth I. Mavor, Michael. J. Platow & Boris Bizumic (Eds.), Self and social identity in educational contexts, (pp. 211-222). Abingdon: Routledge.
  3. Bobis, J., & Ewing, R. (2017). Transforming educational practice through action research: Four Australian examples. In R. Rowell, C. Bruce, J. Shosh & M. Riel (Eds.), Palgrave International Handbook of Action Research (pp. 345-361), New York: Palgrave MacMillan.
  4. Bobis, J., & Way, J. (In press). Building connections between young children’s representations and their conceptual development in mathematics. In Lai, M., Muir, T., & Kinnear, V. (Eds.). Forging Connections in Early Mathematics Teaching and Learning, New York: Springer.
  5. Ellis, R. A., Han, F., & Pardo, A. (In press). Measuring engagement in the university student experience of learning in blended environments. In R. A. Ellis & P. Goodyear (Eds.), Spaces of Teaching and Learning: integrating perspectives on research and practice. Netherlands: Springer.
  6. Goodyear, P., & Markauskaite, L. (2017, accepted). Epistemic resourcefulness and the development of evaluative judgement. In D. Boud, R. Ajjawi, P. Dawson, & J. Tai (Eds.), Developing evaluative judgement in higher education: Assessment for knowing and producing quality work. Routledge (accepted: May 2017, publication: end of 2017).
  7. Goodyear, P., Carvalho, L., Hodgson, V., de Laat, M. (2017). Conclusion: Place-based spaces for networked learning: Emerging themes and issues.  In L. Carvalho, P. Goodyear, M. de Laat (Eds.), Place-based spaces for networked learning, (pp. 242-260). New York: Routledge.
  8. Liu, D., Bartimote-Aufflick, K., Pardo, A., Bridgeman, A. (2017). Data-driven personalization of student learning support in higher education. In Alejandro Pena-Ayala (Eds.), Learning Analytics: Fundaments, Applications, and Trends: A view of the current state of the art to enhance e-Learning, (pp. 143-169). Cham: Springer.
  9. Pardo, A., Mirriahi, N. (2017). Design, Deployment and Evaluation of a Flipped Learning First-Year Engineering Course. In Carl Reidsema, Lydia Kavanagh, Roger Hadgraft, Neville Smith (Eds.), The Flipped Classroom: Practice and Practices in Higher Education, (pp. 177-191). Singapore: Springer.
  10. Reimann, P. & Markauskaite L. (2018, accepted). Expertise. In F. Fischer, C. E. Hmelo-Silver, S. R. Goldman & P. Reimann (Eds.), International handbook of the learning sciences. Routledge/Taylor & Francis (accepted: August 2017, publication: early 2018).
  11. Reimann, P., & Bannert, M. (2018). Self-Regulation of Learning and Performance in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments. In D. H. Schunk & J. A. Greene (Eds.), Handbook of self-regulation of learning and performance (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.
  12. Simpson, A., Walsh, M. (2017). Mobile literacies: Moving from the word to the world. In C. Burnett, G. Merchant, A. Simpson & M. Walsh (Eds.), The case of the iPad: Mobile literacies in education, (pp. 257-265). Singapore: Springer.
  13. Simpson, A., Walsh, M. (2017). Multimodal layering: Students learning with iPads in primary school classrooms. In C. Burnett, G. Merchant, A. Simpson & M. Walsh (Eds.), The case of the iPad: Mobile literacies in education, (pp. 67--85). Singapore: Springer
  14. Thompson, K., Alhadad, S. S. J., Buckingham Shum, S., Howard, S., Knight, S., Martinez-Maldonado, R., & Pardo, A. (In press). Connecting expert knowledge in the design of classroom learning experiences. In J. M. Lodge, J. Cooney Horvath, & L. Corrin (Eds.), Learning analytics in the classroom: translating learning analytics research for teachers. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis.
  15. Trede, F., Goodyear, P., Macfarlane, S., Markauskaite, L., McEwen, C., & Tayebjee, F. (2017). Learning in hybrid spaces: Designing a mobile technology capacity building framework for workplace learning. In T. Bowen & M. T. B. Drysdale (Eds.), Work-integrated learning in the 21st century (pp. 83–97). Bingley, UK: Emerald. [Citations – NA]

Journal articles

  1. Durksen, T., Way, J., Bobis, J., Anderson, J., Skilling, K., & Martin, A. (2017). Motivation and engagement in mathematics: A qualitative framework for teacher-student interactions. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 29, 163-181. DOI: 10.1007/s13394-017-0199-
  2. Ellis, R. A., Han, F., & Pardo, A. (2017). Improving insights from learning analytics—the value of combining observational and self-report data on university student learning. Educational Technology & Society, 20(3), 158-169.
  3. Gašević, D., Jovanović, J., Pardo, A., & Dawson, S. (2017). Detecting learning strategies with analytics: Links with self-reported measures and academic performance. Journal of Learning Analytics, 4(2), 113-128.
  4. Hamshire, C., Forsyth, R., Bell, A., Benton, M., Kelly-Laubscher, R., Paxton, M, & Wolfgramm-Foliaki, E. (2017). The potential of student narratives to enhance quality in higher education. Quality in Higher Education, 23(1), 50-64.
  5. Hilton, C., Calilhanna, A., Milne, A. (2018). Visualizing and sonifying mathematical music theory with software applications: Implications of computer-based models for practice and education. In Marianna Montiel, Fernando Gomez (Eds.), Theoretical and Practical Pedagogy of Mathematical Music Theory. Singapore: World Scientific.
  6. Jovanovic, J., Gašević, D., Pardo, A., Dawson, S., & Mirriahi, N. (2017). Learning Analytics to Unveil Learning Strategies in a Flipped Classroom. The Internet and Higher Education, 23(April), 74-85. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2017.02.001
  7. Jovanovic, J., Gasevicy, D., Dawson, S., Pardo, A., Mirriahi, N. (2017). Learning analytics to unveil learning strategies in a flipped classroom. Internet and Higher Education, 33, 74-85
  8. Khan, S. M. H., & Markauskaite, L. (2017, accepted). Technical and vocational teachers’ conceptions of ICT in the workplace: bridging the gap between teaching and professional practice. Journal of Educational Computing Research, accepted 12 November 2017. [Impact – 0.678; Rank – 176/236; Citations – NA]
  9. Khan, S. M. H., & Markauskaite, L. (2017). Approaches to ICT-enhanced teaching in technical and vocational education: A phenomenographic perspective. Higher Education, 73(5), 691–707. doi: 10.1007/s10734-016-9990-2 [Impact – 1.571; Rank – 63/236; Citations – 2]
  10. Liu, M., Pardo, A., Liu, L. (2017). Using learning analytics to support engagement in collaborative writing. International Journal of Distance Education Technologies, 15(4), 79-99.
  11.     11. Markauskaite, L., Kelly, N., & Jacobson, M. (2017, accepted). Model-based knowing: How do students ground their understanding about climate systems in agent-based computer models? Place-based spaces for networked learning Research in Science Education, accepted 14 November 2017. [Impact – 1.329; Rank – 88/236; Citations – NA]
  12. Martinez Maldonado, R., Goodyear, P., Carvalho, L., Thompson, K., Hernandez-Leo, D., Dimitriadis, Y., Prieto, L., Wardak, D. (2017). Supporting collaborative design activity in a multi-user digital design ecology. Computers in Human Behavior, 71, 327-342.
  13.     13. Mladenovic, R., Martinov-Bennie, N., & Bell, A. (2017). Business students' insights into their development of ethical decision-making. Journal of Business Ethics, Online first.
  14.    14. Pardo, A. (2017). A feedback model for data-rich learning experiences. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 1-11. doi:10.1080/02602938.2017.1356905
  15. Pardo, A., Han, F., Ellis, R. (2017). Combining University Student Self-Regulated Learning Indicators and Engagement with Online Learning Events to Predict Academic Performance. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, 10(1), 82-92
  16.     16. Simpson, A. (2017). Teachers negotiating professional agency through literature-based assessment. Literacy, 51(2), 111-119.
  17. Tang, LM, & Kay, J. (2017) Harnessing Long Term Physical Activity Data - How Long-term Trackers Use Data and How an Adherence-based Interface Supports New Insights. IMWUT, Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies. 1(2): 26:1-26:28
  18. Way, J. & Bobis, J. (2017). The literacy of mathematics. PETTA Paper, 208, 1-12.

Full Refereed papers in conference proceedings

  1. Cao, L., Jacobson, M. J., & Markauskaite, L. (2017). The Use of a Project-Based Learning Virtual World to Learn Nutrition Knowledge. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Antonio, Texas, USA.
  2. Dawson, S., Jovanovic, J., Gasevic, D., Pardo, A. (2017). From prediction to impact: Evaluation of a learning analytics retention program. 7th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK 2017), New York, NY: The Association for Computing Machinery.
  3. Levin, J. A., & Jacobson, M. J. (2017). Education as a complex system: Implications for educational research and policy. Annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Antonio, Texas.
  4. Markauskaite, L. & Goodyear P. (2017). Learning as construction of actionable concepts: A multimodal blending perspective.  17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, “Education in the Crossroads of Economy and Politics Role of Research in the Advancement of Public Good”, 27 August – 2 September 2017, Tampere, Finland.
  5. Markauskaite, L. & Goodyear, P. (2017). Insights into the dynamics between changes in professional fields and teaching in higher education. The 17th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction “Education in the Crossroads of Economy and Politics Role of Research in the Advancement of Public Good”. Tampere, Finland, 27 August – 2 September 2017.
  6. Markauskaite, L., & Goodyear, P. (2017). Preparing students for the workplace through designing productive assessment tasks: An actionable knowledge perspective. Proceedings of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) conference, July 2017. Sydney, Australia: HERDSA. (11pp).
  7. Martinez-Maldonado, R., Hernandez-Leo, D., Pardo, A., Ogata, H. (2017). 2nd Cross-LAK: Learning analytics across physical and digital spaces. 7th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK 2017), New York, NY: The Association for Computing Machinery.

Selected invited presentations

  1. Goodyear, P (2017) Education, technology and design, Invited keynote, 50th Anniversary Conference, Dept of Educational Research, Lancaster University, UK, September.
  2. Goodyear, P (2017) Shaping spaces, Invited keynote, Annual Conference of the Association for Learning Technology, Liverpool, UK, September.
  3. Goodyear, P (2017) Thriving in higher education: how does good design help? Invited keynote, Learning and Teaching Conference, Deakin University, Melbourne, November.
  4. Goodyear, P., Markauskaite, L. (2017). Assessment as boundary work: between the discipline and the profession. Invited workshop. University of Deakin, Melbourne, November.
  5. Jacobson, MJ. The Third Wave of EdTech: Fusing VR, AI, and Cognitive Learning to Transform 21st Century Learning Environments. Invited keynote talk given at the Hong Kong Learning & Teaching Expo, 2017, December.
  6. Kay, J. (2017). From OLMs + LAK + PI to PIL, Personal Informatics for Learners. Invited keynote. 25th International Conference on Computers in Education (ICCE 2017, Christchurch, New Zealand, December.
  7. Markauskaite, L. (2017). Preparing teachers for knowledgeable action: Epistemic fluency, innovation pedagogy and work-capable graduates. Invited plenary discussion “How do we know it’s because of us? University prepared teachers and our impact on classroom readiness”. 20 February 2017, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
  8. Markauskaite, L. & Goodyear P. (2017). Learning as construction of actionable concepts: A multimodal blending perspective. Presented at the EARLI SIG Methods in Learning Research invited symposium “The unit of analysis in learning research: Approaches for imagining a transformative research agenda”. September.

Impact and Awards

Educational Psychologist best paper award for 2016 (#1 ranked educational research journal, impact factor, 6.257 Journal Citation Reports); Conceptualizing debates in learning and educational research: Towards a complex systems conceptual framework of learning. Jacobson, M. J., Kapur, M., & Reimann, P. (2016)

Jacobson, MJ. Member of Global Access Partners Advisory Group for the Australian Minister of Education, 2015-present); Founder and CEO, Pallas Advanced Learning Systems Pty Ltd (company has a licensing agreement with the University of Sydney to commercialising IP from Jacobson’s ARC funded research)