At the nexus of learning and innovation

2016 CRLI ANNUAL REPORT

SCHOOL/DIVISION/CENTRE/UNIT

Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI)

YEAR OF REPORT

2016

MISSION STATEMENT

In January 2016 CoCo and the Sciences and Technologies of Learning (STL) research network transformed into a new research centre, the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI).

This new centre has strong roots in Education, with substantial involvement from Engineering & IT, Science, Health Sciences and Medicine. As with CoCo, membership of the centre is open to all members of university staff and postgraduate students with a serious interest in research in this area.

CRLI provides a focus for the university’s research on learning and innovation. In addition to conducting fundamental research on learning, the centre investigates educational innovation, including processes and structures which improve the connections between research on learning, sustainable educational innovation and the enhancement of learning outcomes. Its remit also includes researching processes of innovation and change outside formal education, whenever such change involves a significant element of individual, group, organisational or community learning. The centre thereby provides an intellectual home for all staff and students interested in researching learning, innovation and change - in formal education and also in workplace and community settings.

Methodological innovation is a core activity for the centre. This reflects a conviction that the speed and complexity of change in the world demand new forms of inquiry that can connect evidence to action in a timely way. So the centre will develop new methods for linking research and practice.

It will forge close, long-term relationships with a small number of major partner organisations: users of, and sites for, our research. In studying learning and innovation, the centre will advance the field of coordination science: the study of how coordination occurs in the brain, between brain and body, between individuals and their (technology-rich) environment, in groups, in organisations and networks.

CRLI will help the University realise its aspirations to be the leading, research-intensive university in Australia with outstanding researchers, networks and partnerships that improve the lives of our local and global communities.

Summary of achievements in 2016

  1. The Centre came into being on 1st Jan 2016.
  2. The Centre Management Team (MT) began monthly meetings in March 2016. It consists of 15 people, from EDSW, FEIT, Science, and Health Sciences.
  3. An Executive Team has been established - consisting of the two co-directors (Peter Goodyear and Peter Reimann) and two deputy directors (Lina Markauskaite and Abelardo Pardo), supported by Sadhbh Warren.
  4. Membership of the Centre currently stands at ≈215 staff and research students, of whom ≈60 are (external) affiliate members – including PhD alumni. ≈70 members were also involved in the Centre’s predecessor Sciences & Technologies of Learning (SyReNs) network.
  5. One of the main tasks in 2016 has been to develop and gain approval for the CRLI Strategic Plan (2016-20) and the Operational Plan for 2016. The University’s Strategic Plan also became a resource when it was released in March 2016. These were endorsed by the first meeting of the CRLI Steering Committee 23rd June 2016 and can be found as appendices to this report.
  6. The MT has also worked on defining a distinctive approach to research capacity building, focussed on the needs of university staff involved in education innovation projects and on RHD training.
  7. The Centre had a very successful launch event on 2nd August 2016 with ≈120 people attending.
  8. The Centre has participated in the University’s Education & Research Innovation week (October 2016), in the Faculty’s research partnerships event in early November, and co-presented several events with Sydney Ideas.
  9. The Wednesday seminar series (Research on Learning and Educational Innovation), which ran throughout 2016, attracted internal and external experts, and international visitors to present their research on learning and educational innovation. Practical organisation was looked after by CRLI PhD students. See the appendices for more information on CRLI events.
  10. Four SIGs have been established – the Learning Analytics Research Group (a joint venture with the DVCE portfolio, convened by Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick and Abelardo Pardo) and the Neuroscience and Education SIG (convened by Minkang Kim). Two further SIGs are now being formalized: Teaching and learning for interdisciplinarity, and New learning spaces. See the appendices for more information.
  11. Two half-time postgraduate fellowships were advertised in July 2016 and filled in September 2016.
  12. CRLI hosted three international researchers during the year. These scholars presented their recent research results in the CoCo Seminar Series and the CoCo weekly meetings, and also spent highly valued time giving students feedback on their research and consulting with CoCo staff members. These visits also provided opportunities for collaborative writing of journal articles and conference papers, planning future research collaboration, and building bridges with research overseas.
  13. CRLI aims to provide an active, supportive home for PhD students and ECRs, helping them develop as researchers and connecting them with the national and international research community. In 2016 we continued with activities including an ongoing series of methodology workshops, informal reading groups and a PhD colloquium – held twice a year, with each PhD student giving a 30 minute talk on their work and receiving feedback from staff and other students. We also incorporated a brief presentation from a member of the team into the start of each CRLI weekly lab meeting, as a way of sharing information about current research.
  14. Discussions have begun with senior staff in DVCE portfolio – the first of our major user partners - to work out the best approach to establishing an ongoing partnership. Priority areas have been identified and DVCE has agreed to fund a half-time postgraduate fellow to work on new learning spaces (starting in March 2017).
  15. As a new centre, CRLI have developed and implemented a communication strategy to raise our profile and ensure stakeholders understand what we have to offer and how to access relevant expertise. The emphasis in 2016 was on the raising awareness of membership, Centre mission and activities through avenues including a mailing list, blog, Yammer, Twitter, and a holding website. We also made an introductory video; “Who are CRLI”.

STAFFING AND ADMINISTRATION

EXECUTIVE TEAM

Co-directors:                    Peter Goodyear & Peter Reimann

Deputy directors:             Lina Markauskaite, Abelardo Pardo

CRLI coordinator:            Sadhbh Warren

MANAGEMENT TEAM (INITIAL TERM)

Prof Janette Bobis (2016-2017)

Assoc Prof Rob Ellis (2016-2017)   

Prof Peter Goodyear (2016-2017) 

Prof Michael Jacobson (2016-2019) 

Prof Judy Kay (2016-2017)

Dr Minkang Kim (2016-2019)

Assoc Prof Lina Markauskaite (2016-2017)

Assoc Prof Abelardo Pardo (2016-2019)

Prof Phil Poronnik (2016-2019)

Prof Peter Reimann (2016-2019)

Dr Jen Scott Curwood (2016-2019)

Assoc Prof Manjula Sharma (2016-2017)

Prof Tim Shaw (2016-2017)

Assoc Prof Alyson Simpson (2016-2017)

 

WORKING GROUPS

Each Working Group has at least one member of the MT as a key player, ensuring good information flow & alignment. Each aims to also have PhD students volunteering some time, in return for learning opportunities/mentoring in the area concerned.

  1. Research capacity-building
  2. Communications
  3. Publications
  4. International research partnerships
  5. Major events

VISITING SCHOLARS IN 2016

  1. Ping He, School of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China
  2. Professor Eleonora Milano Falcão Vieira, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil
  3. Professor Maria de Fátima Sousa e Silva, Institute of Classical Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal
  4. Professor Sug-Joon Ahn, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, South Korea

 

Appendix One

SELECTION OF GRANT ACTIVE IN 2016

  1. A Competence Framework for Teacher Data Literacy; Reimann P; DVC Research/Bridging Support Grant.
  2. Agent-based virtual learning environments for understanding science. Jacobson, M; Richards, D; Taylor, C; Sutherland, L; Kapur, M; ARC Discovery Project, 2015-17.
  3. e-Dietitian for e-nutrition: Feasibility of an ICT-enabled model of care to support implementation of evidence-based nutrition care pathways for patients undergoing surgery for Upper Gastrointestinal Cancers in Sydney Local Health District; Shaw T, Carey S, Findlay M, Sandroussi C, Murray S, Harrison M, Solomon M, Rankin N, Beale P; Sydney Local Health District/Cancer Services Research Grant.
  4. Enhancing Workplace Learning Through Mobile Technology; Trede F, Goodyear P, Markauskaite L, Macfarlane S, Tayebjee F; Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT)/OLT Grants (OLT Innovation & development Grant ID14-3535, 2015-2016)
  5. Furthering and Sustaining the Implementation Science Community of Practice and Education Program; Shaw T, Kielly-Carroll C; Cancer Institute New South Wales/Community of Practice.
  6. Implementing evidence into practice to improve chronic lung disease management in Indigenous Australians: the "Breathe Easy, Walk Easy-Lungs for Life" (BE WELL) project; Alison J, Jenkins C, Maguire G, Jan S, Shaw T, Dennis S, McKeough Z, Lee V; National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)/NHMRC/ GACD Request for Applications on the prevention and management of chronic lung disease.
  7. Modelling complex learning spaces. Ellis, R; Goodyear, P; Fisher, K; Marmot, A; ARC Discovery Project, 2015-19
  8. Quantifying intake of food prepared outside home during emerging adulthood; Allman-Farinelli M, Kay J, Chapman K, Hughes C, Watson W, Rangan A, Yacef K, Koprinska I, Mhurchu C, Bauman A; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Linkage Projects (LP).
  9. Scaling the provision of personalised learning support actions for large student cohorts; Pardo A, Dawson S, Shum S, Siemens G, Gasevic D, Schulte J, Martinez Maldonado R, Mirriahi N, Vigentini L, Bartimote-Aufflick K, McIntyre S; Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT)/OLT Grants.
  10. Solving the inert knowledge problem. Goldwater, M; Jacobson, M; Livesey, E; ARC Discovery Project, 2015-17
  11. Speak out: Fostering intercultural dialogue and social transformation through spoken word poetry; Curwood J; Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (Federal)/Australian National Commission for UNESCO Grants Program.
  12. Supporting provision of palliative care and advance care planning in general practice: a toolkit and training package targeting practice nurses; Clayton J, Shaw T, Morton R, Halcomb E, Rhee J, Mitchell G, Phillips J; Department of Health/Research Grant.
  13. Sydney West Translational Cancer Research Centre (SW-TCRC); Harnett P, deFazio A, Shaw T, George J, Mann G, Balleine R, Flynn P; Cancer Institute New South Wales/Translational Cancer Research Centre.

APPENDIX TWO: EVENTS HOSTED BY CRLI IN 2016

CRLI Launch

On August 2, the Faculty of Education and Social Work launched the Centre with a lively session of guest speakers, quickfire research presentations, paper plane throwing and plenty of concrete information on how people could engage, followed by some welcome refreshments and chat. Highlights can be seen at:

Special events

1. 23 Feb - Video assessment of teacher supportive behaviour - Special seminar with Dr Antonia Scholkmann

2. 4 Mar - Sydney Ideas talk co-presented with the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) portfolio -"Neuroscience and Learning Analytics: a historic leap in understanding learning?" - Prof George Siemens

3. 11 Mar - Sydney Ideas talk co-presented with the Charles Perkins Centre Science of Learning Science Node - “A Scientific Approach to Teaching Science and Engineering” - Prof Carl Wieman.

4.  Oct 20 - Special seminar with Prof Malt Joshi - Language and Literacy: The Obligations of the Schools of Education

5. Oct 24 - Innovation Week workshop - Can data help me better understand and support learners?

 

CRLI Seminar Series

Feb 8     Dr Lennart Shalk: Introducing physics concepts in primary school

Feb 23   Antonia Scholkmann: Video assessment of teacher supportive behaviour

Mar 23   Christine Preston: Toys for learning and teaching science

Apr 6     Piergiorgio Trevisan: Shall We Play A Game? Connections between visual attention and reading

Apr 13   Daniel Hutto: The enactive roots of learning: rethinking educational design

Apr 20   Gareth Roberts: The neuroscience of goal neglect

Apr 27   Fiona Hibberd: Justifying qualitative research

May 4   Janica Nordstrom: Online and off-screen (inter)actions in online learning

May 11  Michael Jacobson and Peter Reimann: Conceptualising debates in learning and education research

Jun 1    Chris Holden: The local games lab: grassroots engagement with games, learning, mobile, and place

Jun 15   Franziska Trede: Workshop: enhancing workplace learning through mobile technology

Aug 3    Nina Bonderup Dohn: Designing for transformation of situated knowledge

Aug 10   Lina Markauskaite: Epistemic fluency in higher education

Aug 24   Jen Ross: Speculative method in digital education research

Aug 31   Pippa Yeoman: Lessons in reading the learning landscape

Oct 12   Craig Napier: Insights to action -a transformative approach to business analytics

Oct 19   Simon Knight: Sites of epistemic cognition

Nov 2    Jess McBroom and Kalina Yacef: Learning Analytics Research Group (LARG) showcase session

 

CRLI on Social Media

Some of our platforms include:

  1. Webpage - http://sydney.edu.au/research/about/research_centres/crli.shtml   
  2. University of Sydney Yammer group at http://bit.ly/CRLIyammer  
  3. Twitter account - @CRLI_Usyd https://twitter.com/CRLI_Usyd  
  4. Blog - http://bit.ly/blogCRLI 

 

APPENDIX THREE

CRLI SIGs - ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES AND EXPECTATIONS

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) provide a mechanism for researchers with shared interests to work together on projects and activities of mutual concern. They are primary sites for community-building and for the development of research expertise. Among other things, they create methodological, theoretical and other resources for CRLI as a whole.

SIG membership is open to all members of CRLI. People who are not eligible to be members of CRLI may join a SIG at the invitation of the SIG convenors.

Each SIG should have at least one convenor and ideally will have two – or a convenor and a deputy convenor. SIG convenors will be approved by the CRLI Management Team (MT), normally for a two year, renewable, term of office.

Each SIG should plan to:

  • Produce a short statement (200-400 words) explaining its core aims
  • Organise at least one public event per year
  • Organise at least one workshop/course/master class per year
  • Organise at least two other SIG meetings per year
  • Produce at least three CRLI blog postings a year
  • Create and update white papers, annotated bibliographies, lists of recommended research resources etc in its area(s) of expertise
  • Identify emerging research opportunities and contribute to the development of joint research activities and research proposals
  • Plan and notify CRLI as to the ongoing preferred communication channel/s and storage method for members the SIG

SIGs may co-badge their events with other organisations but should always mention CRLI in event publicity/materials etc.

SIGs will report on their activities to the November meeting of the MT each year. This (1 page) report should also contain an outline plan for the year ahead.

New SIGs may be proposed to the MT in response to a call for expressions of interest.

SIGs recognised in 2016

  1. Learning Analytics Research Group (joint with DVCE portfolio)
  2. Neuroscience and Education
  3. Innovative Learning Spaces
  4. Interdisciplinary knowledge, learning and innovation

There are calls for expressions of interest at least once each year.

 

APPENDIX FOUR: SELECTED PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Books

  1. Markauskaite, L., Goodyear, P. (2017). Epistemic fluency and professional education: Innovation, knowledgeable action and actionable knowledge. Dordrecht: Springer.
  2. Simpson, A. (2016). The Use of Children's Literature in Teaching: A study of politics and professionalism within teacher education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Edited books

  1. Haywood, J., Aleven, V., Kay, J., Roll, I. (2016). Proceedings of the Third (2016) ACM Conference on Learning @ Scale. New York: ACM.
  2. Rapp, A., Cena, F., Kay, J., Kummerfeld, R., Hopfgartner, F., Plumbaum, T., Larsen, J., Epstein, D., Gouveia, R. (2016). UbiComp '16 Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing: Adjunct. New York: ACM.
  3. Reimann, P., Bell, S., Kickmeier-Rust, M., Vatrapu, R., Wasson, B. (2016). Measuring and Visualizing Learning in the Information-Rich Classroom. New York: Routledge.

Book chapters

  1. Goodyear, P., Carvalho, L., Dohn, N. (2016). Artefacts and activities in the analysis of learning networks. In Thomas Ryberg, Christine Sinclair, Sian Bayne and Maarten de Laat (Eds.), Research, boundaries, and policy in networked learning (pp. 93-110). Switzerland: Springer.
  2. Harbon, L., Smyth, C. (2016). Creating an ecology of affordances to allow Australian pre-service teachers to get to know and make sense of China. In Margaret Robertson and Po Keung Eric Tsang (Eds.), Everyday knowledge, education and sustainable futures: Transdisciplinary approaches in the Asia-Pacific region, (pp. 195-208). Singapore: Springer.
  3. Markauskaite, L., Jacobson, M. (2016). Tracking and assessing students' learning strategies in model-based learning environments. In Peter Reimann, Susan Bull, Michael Kickmeier-Rust, Ravi Vatrapu, Barbara Wasson (Eds.), Measuring and Visualizing Learning in the Information-Rich Classroom, (pp. 137-153). New York: Routledge.
  4. Pardo, A., Dawson, S. (2016). Learning Analytics: How can Data be used to Improve Learning Practice? In Peter Reimann, Susan Bull, Michael Kickmeier-Rust, Ravi Vatrapu, Barbara Wasson (Eds.), Measuring and Visualizing Learning in the Information-Rich Classroom, (pp. 41-55). New York: Routledge.
  5. Reimann, P., Khosronejad, M. (2016). Designing Authentic Assessments in Higher Education. In Peter Reimann, Susan Bull, Michael Kickmeier-Rust, Ravi Vatrapu, Barbara Wasson (Eds.), Measuring and Visualizing Learning in the Information-Rich Classroom, (pp. 92-106). New York: Routledge.
  6. Sankey, D., & Kim, M. (2016). Cultivating moral values in an age of neuroscience. In C. W. Joldersma (Eds.), Neuroscience and education: A philosophical appraisal, (pp. 111-127). New York: Routledge.
  7. Thompson, K., Markauskaite, L., Hussain, S. (2016). Identifying group processes and affect in learners: A holistic approach to assessment in virtual worlds in higher education. Leadership and Personnel Management: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, (pp. 2056-2082). Hershey: Business Science Reference.
  8. Vatrapu, R., Reimann, P., Hussain, A., Pantazos, K. (2016). Repertory grids for formative assessment: Concept, method, tools and findings. In Peter Reimann, Susan Bull, Michael Kickmeier-Rust, Ravi Vatrapu, Barbara Wasson (Eds.), Measuring and Visualizing Learning in the Information-Rich Classroom, (pp. 121-136). New York: Routledge.
  9. Way, J., Bobis, J., Lamb, J., Higgins, J. (2016). Researching curriculum, policy and leadership in mathematics education. In K. Makar, S. Dole, J. Visnovska, M. Goos, A. Bennison, K. Fry (Eds.), Research in Mathematics Education in Australasia 2012-2015, (pp. 49-71). Singapore: Springer.

Journal articles

  1. Bartimote-Aufflick, K., Bridgeman, A., Walker, R., Sharma, M., Smith, L. (2016). The study, evaluation, and improvement of university student self-efficacy. Studies in Higher Education, 41(11), 1918-1942.
  2. Bobis, J., Way, J., Anderson, J., Martin, A. (2016). Challenging teacher beliefs about student engagement in mathematics. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 19(1), 33-55.
  3. Briffa, J., Grinfeld, E., Poronnik, P., McAinch, A., Hryciw, D. (2016). Uptake of leptin and albumin via separate pathways in proximal tubule cells. The International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 79, 194-198.
  4. Bruckel, J., Carballo, V., Kalibatas, O., Soule, M., Wynne, K., Ryan, M., Shaw, T., Co, J. (2016). Use of spaced education to deliver a curriculum in quality, safety and value for postgraduate medical trainees: trainee satisfaction and knowledge. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 92(1085), 137-14
  5. Bull, S., Kay, J. (2016). SMILI :) : a Framework for Interfaces to Learning Data in Open Learner Models, Learning Analytics and Related Fields. International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, 26(1), 293-331.
  6. Camera, D., Coleman, H., Parkington, H., Jenkins, T., Pow, D., Boase, N., Kumar, S., Poronnik, P. (2016). Learning, memory and long-term potentiation are altered in Nedd4 heterozygous mice. Behavioural Brain Research, 303, 176-181.
  7. Clayphan, A., Martinez Maldonado, R., Tomitsch, M., Atkinson, S., Kay, J. (2016). An In-the-Wild Study of Learning to Brainstorm: Comparing Cards, Tabletops and Wall Displays in the Classroom. Interacting with Computers, 28(6), 788-810.
  8. Durksen, T., Way, J., Bobis, J., Anderson, J., Skilling, K., Martin, A. (2016). Motivation and engagement in mathematics: A qualitative framework for teacher-student interactions. Mathematics Education Research Journal, Online first.
  9. Ellis, R., Goodyear, P. (2016). Context and Implications Document for: Models of learning space: integrating research on space, place and learning in higher education. Review of Education, 4(2), 192-194.
  10. Ellis, R., Goodyear, P. (2016). Models of learning space: integrating research on space, place and learning in higher education. Review of Education, 4(2), 149-191.
  11. Ellis, R., Pardo, A., Han, F. (2016). Quality in blended learning environments - Significant differences in how students approach learning collaborations. Computers & Education, 102, 90-102.
  12. Gunn, H., Zhao, Y., Pardo, A., Calvo, R., Steinbeck, K. (2016). Transitionmate: A Mobile Phone Application to Support Self-Management and Transition in Young People With Chronic Illness. Journal of Adolescent Health, 58(2), S74-S75.
  13. Heneka, N., Shaw, T., Rowett, D., Phillips, J. (2016). Quantifying the burden of opioid medication errors in adult oncology and palliative care settings: A systematic review. Palliative Medicine, 30(6), 520-532.
  14. Jacobson, M., Kapur, M., Reimann, P. (2016). Conceptualizing Debates in Learning and Educational Research: Toward a Complex Systems Conceptual Framework of Learning. Educational Psychologist, 51(2), 210-218.
  15. Janssen, A., Shaw, T., Bradbury, L., Moujaber, T., Nørrelykke, A., Zerillo, J., LaCasce, A., Co, J., Robinson, T., Starr, A., et al (2016). A mixed methods approach to developing and evaluating oncology trainee education around minimization of adverse events and improved patient quality and safety. BMC Medical Education, 16, 1-9.
  16. Janssen, A., Shaw, T., Nagrial, A., Pene, C., Rabbets, M., Carlino, M., Zachulski, C., Phillips, J., Birnbaum, R., Gandhi, T., et al (2016). An Online Learning Module to Increase Self-Efficacy and Involvement in Care for Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer: Research Protocol. JMIR Research Protocols, 5(3), 1-8.
  17. Janssen, A., Robinson, T., Provan, P., Shaw, T. (2016). The Sydney West Knowledge Portal: Evaluating the Growth of a Knowledge Portal to Support Translational Research. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18(6), 1-5.
  18. Khan, S., Markauskaite, L. (2016). Approaches to ICT-enhanced teaching in technical and vocational education: a phenomenographic perspective. Higher Education, Online first.
  19. Locock, K., Bakas, T., Sanai, F., Allan, R., Hinton, T. (2016). What Is the "Areca" in "Areca Nuts? Extraction and Neuroactive Bioassay of Arecoline. Journal of Chemical Education, 93(1), 197-201.   
  20. Ng, C., Duke, R., Hinton, T., Johnston, G. (2016). GABAA receptor cysteinyl mutants and the ginkgo terpenoid lactones bilobalide and ginkgolides. European Journal of Pharmacology, 777, 136-146.
  21. Markose, S., Simpson, A. (2016). 'I want them better than me': Pedagogical strategies employed by four immigrant parents in the face of perceived forms of exclusion by school authorities. Race Ethnicity and Education, 19(3), 659-682.
  22. Olver, I., von Dincklage, J., Shaw, T. (2016). Improving uptake of wiki-based guidelines with Qstream education. Medical Education, 50(5), 590-591.
  23. Pardo, A. (2016). Taming the Emerging Data Ecosystem in Higher Education Institutions. APAC CIO Outlook, CXO Insights.
  24. Rangan, A., Tieleman, L., Louie, J., Tang, L., Hebden, L., Roy, R., Kay, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2016). Electronic Dietary Intake Assessment (e-DIA): Relative validity of a mobile phone application to measure intake of food groups. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(12), 2219-2226.
  25. Rankin, N., McGregor, D., Butow, P., White, K., Phillips, J., Young, J., Pearson, S., York, S., Shaw, T. (2016). Adapting the nominal group technique for priority setting of evidence-practice gaps in implementation science. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16(1), 1-9.
  26. Ross, P., Poronnik, P. (2016). Deficit and decline in Australian science; when shall we learn? Australian Zoologist, in press.
  27. Shaw, J., Price, M., Clayton, J., Grimison, P., Shaw, T., Rankin, N., Butow, P. (2016). Developing a clinical pathway for the identification and management of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients: an online Delphi consensus process. Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(1), 33-41.
  28. Sheppard, C., Sharma, M., Arbouet, A. (2016). Axial apodizing filters for confocal imaging. Optik/ Optics: International Journal for Light and Electron Optics, 111(8), 347-354.
  29. Simpson, A. (2016). Choosing to teach with quality literature: From reading (through talk) to writing. Scan, 35(4), 26-38.
  30. Simpson, A. (2016). Designing pedagogic strategies for dialogic learning in higher education. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 25(2), 135-151.
  31. Simpson, A. (2016). Dialogic teaching in the initial teacher education classroom: "Everyone's voice will be heard". Research Papers in Education, 31(1), 89-106.
  32. Simpson, A. (2016). Teachers negotiating professional agency through literature-based assessment. Literacy, Online first.
  33. Skilling, K., Bobis, J., Martin, A., Anderson, J., Way, J. (2016). What secondary teachers think and do about student engagement in mathematics. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 28(4), 545-566.
  34. Sujarittham, T., Emarat, N., Arayathanitkul, K., Sharma, M., Johnston, I., Tanamatayarat, J. (2016). Developing specialized guided worksheets for active learning in physics lectures. European Journal of Physics, 37(2), 1-17.
  35. Turner, S., Shaw, T. (2016). Developing competence in biostatistics and research methodology during medical specialty training. Medical Journal of Australia, 204(2), 54-56e.
  36. Turner, S., Sundaresan, P., Robledo, K., Pryor, D., Gebski, V., Shaw, T. (2016). Engaging Future Clinical Oncology Researchers: An Initiative to Integrate Teaching of Biostatistics and Research Methodology into Specialty Training. Clinical Oncology, 28(5), 306-316.
  37. Yeung, A., Raju, S., Sharma, M. (2016). Online lecture recordings and lecture attendance: Investigating student preferences in a large first year psychology course. Journal of Learning Design, 9(1), 55-71.

Conferences

  1. Abu Bakar, K., Way, J., Bobis, J. (2016). Young children's drawings in problem solving. 39th Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (MERGA 2016), Adelaide: MERGA
  2. Ackad, C., Tomitsch, M., Kay, J. (2016). Skeletons and Silhouettes: Comparing User Representations at a Gesture-based Large Display. 2016 34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  3. Aleven, V., Haywood, J., Kay, J., Roll, I. (2016). Learning at scale 2016 preface. 3rd Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L@S 2016, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  4. Bakharia, A., Kitto, K., Pardo, A., Gašević, D., Dawson, S. (2016). Recipe for Success - Lessons learnt from using xAPI within the connected learning analytics toolkit. 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK 2016, New York: ACM.
  5. Bull, S., Ginon, B., Kay, J., Kickmeier-Rust, M., Johnson, M. (2016). LAL workshop: Learning analytics for learners. 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK 2016, New York: ACM.
  6. Bull, S., Ginon, B., Kay, J., Kickmeier-Rust, M., Johnson, M. (2016). Learning analytics for learners: Preface to proceedings of first LAL workshop at LAK'1 First International Workshop on Learning Analytics Across Physical and Digital Spaces co-located with 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge (LAK 2016), Edinburgh: CEUR-WS.
  7. Giannakos, M., Sampson, D., Kidzinski, L., Pardo, A. (2016). Enhancing video-based learning experience through smart environments and analytics. LAK 2016 Workshop on Smart Environments and Analytics in Video-Based Learning (SE@VBL 2016), Edinburgh: CEUR-WS.
  8. Giannakos, M., Sampson, D., Kidzinski, L., Pardo, A. (2016). Smart environments and analytics on video-based learning. 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK 2016, New York: ACM.
  9. Goodyear, P., Carvalho, L. (2016). Activity centred analysis and design in the evolution of learning networks. Tenth International Conference on Networked Learning, Lancaster, UK.
  10. Gordon, T., Sharma, M., Georgiou, H. (2016). A tool for shifting from prescription to inquiry. Proceedings of the 47th Annual ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association) Conference, Netherlands: Springer Netherlands.
  11. Hernandez-Leo, D., Pardo, A. (2016). Towards integrated learning design with across-spaces learning analytics: A flipped classroom example. First International Workshop on Learning Analytics Across Physical and Digital Spaces co-located with 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge (LAK 2016), Edinburgh: CEUR-WS.
  12. Jacobson, M., Lund, K., Hoadley, C., Vatrapu, R., Kolodner, J., Reimann, P. (2016). Beyond just getting our word out: Creating pipelines from learning sciences research to educational practices.
  13. Jacobson, M., Markauskaite, L., Portolese, A., Lai, P., Kapur, M. (2016). Understanding Climate Change as a Complex System with Agent-based Models: A Study of Contrasting Learning Designs. 2016 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C.: AERA.
  14. Karsai, L., Fekete, A., Kay, J., Missier, P. (2016). Clustering provenance - Facilitating provenance exploration through data abstraction. Workshop on Human-In-the-Loop Data Analytics (HILDA 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  15. Kay, J. (2016). Enabling people to harness and control EDM for lifelong, life-wide learning. The 9th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2016), Raleigh: International Educational Data Mining Society.
  16. Khosronejadtoroghi, M., Reimann, P., Markauskaite, L. (2016). Engineering professional identity practices: Investigating the use of web search in collaborative decision making. 33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE 2016), Adelaide: University Of South Australia.
  17. Kitto, K., Bakharia, A., Lupton, M., Mallet, D., Banks, J., Bruza, P., Pardo, A., Shum, S., Dawsony, S., Gasevicy, D., et al (2016). The connected learning analytics toolkit. 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK 2016, New York: ACM.
  18. Lai, P., Jacobson, M., Markauskaite, L. (2016). Agent-Based Models versus video-based visualizations to learn nanoscience concepts: An embodied cognition perspective. 2016 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C.: AERA.
  19. Ludvigsen, S., Jeong, H., Hmelo-Silver, C., Law, N., Cress, U., Reimann, P., Kapur, M., Rummel, N. (2016). Future of the CSCL community. Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners: 12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2016), Singapore: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  20. Martens, W., Poronnik, P., Saunders, D. (2016). Hypothesis-Driven Sonification of Proteomic Data Distributions Indicating Neurodegredation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. 22nd International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD 2016), Canberra: International Community for Auditory Display (ICAD).
  21. Martinez-Maldonado, R., Goodyear, P. (2016). CoCoDeS: Multi-device support for collocated collaborative learning design. 28th Australian Conference on Computer-Human Interaction (OzCHI 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  22. Martinez-Maldonado, R., Goodyear, P., Kay, J., Thompson, K., Carvalho, L. (2016). An Actionable Approach to Understand Group Experience in Complex, Multi-surface Spaces. 2016 34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  23. McDonald, J., Liu, D., Michael, A., Zeng, R., Blumenstein, M., Gunn, C., Leichweis, S., Pardo, A. (2016). Cross-institutional collaboration to support student engagement: SRES version 2. 33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE 2016), Adelaide: University Of South Australia.
  24. Pardo, A., Han, F., Ellis, R. (2016). Exploring the relation between Self-regulation, Online activities, and academic performance: A case study. 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK 2016, New York: ACM.
  25. Pardo, A., Jovanovic, J., Mirriahi, N., Dawson, S., Martinez-Maldonado, R., Gašević, D. (2016). Generating actionable predictive models of academic performance. 6th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK 2016, New York: ACM.
  26. Parker, C., Kay, J., Baldauf, M., Tomitsch, M. (2016). Design implications for interacting with personalised public displays through mobile augmented reality. The 5th ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays (PerDis'16), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  27. Portolese, A., Jacobson, M., Duvivier, R., Markauskaite, L. (2016). Redesigning problem-based learning in medical education: Contrasting solutions to improve consolidation. 12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners (ICLS 2016), Singapore: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  28. Portolese, A., Markauskaite, L., Lai, P., Jacobson, M. (2016). Analyzing patterns of emerging understanding and misunderstanding in collaborative science learning: A method for unpacking critical turning points. Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners: 12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2016), Singapore: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  29. Rapp, A., Cena, F., Kay, J., Kummerfeld, R., Hopfgartner, F., Plumbaum, T., Larsen, L., Epstein, D., Gouveia, R. (2016). New frontiers of quantified self 2: Going beyond numbers. 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  30. Sharma, M., Georgiou, H. (2016). On the use of concept inventories: How can we tell if active learning approaches are working? 2nd World Conference on Physics Education (WCPE), Open Access: iSER, The International Society of Educational Research.
  31. Sharma, M., Kable, S., Yeung, A. (2016). ASELL Schools: Using science investigations to guide teachers' implementation of inquiry-based teaching in their classrooms. Proceedings of the 47th Annual ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association) Conference, Netherlands: Springer Netherlands.
  32. Tang, L., Day, M., Engelen, L., Poronnik, P., Bauman, A., Kay, J. (2016). Daily and hourly adherence: towards understanding activity tracker accuracy. 2016 34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  33. Tongchai, A., Sharma, M., Johnston, I., Arayathanitkul, K. (2016). Students’ conceptual knowledge of mechanical waves across different backgrounds and cultures. UniServe Science Symposium 2008, Sydney, NSW, Australia: UniServe Science.
  34. Wilson, K., Mills, D., Sharma, M., Kirkup, L., Mendez, A., Scott, D. (2016). ACELL for Physics? UniServe Science Symposium 2008, Sydney, NSW, Australia: Uniserve Science.
  35. Yoo, S., Kay, J. (2016). VRun: Running-in-place virtual reality exergame. 28th Australian Conference on Computer-Human Interaction (OzCHI 2016), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
  36. Yu, D., Poon, S., Tran, V., Lam, M., Hines, M., Brunner, M., Keep, M., Power, E., Lowe, R., Shaw, T., Togher, L. (2016). Exploring Health Technology Evaluation in the Context of eHealth: A qualitative study to understand its role in enabling interdisciplinary healthcare. 24th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2016), Istanbul: AIS Electronic Library (AISeL).

Refereed publications

  1. Bartimote-Aufflick, K., Bridgeman, A., Walker, R., Sharma, M., & Smith, L. (2016). The study, evaluation, and improvement of university student self-efficacy. Studies in Higher Education, 41(11), 1918-1942.
  2. Liu, D. Y. T., Taylor, C. E., Bridgeman, A. J., Bartimote-Aufflick, K., & Pardo, A. (2016). Empowering instructors through customizable collection and analyses of actionable information. Refereed paper for the 1st Learning Analytics for Curriculum and Program Quality Improvement Workshop co-located with the 6th International Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference (LAK), 25 April 2016 in Edinburgh, UK.