At the nexus of learning and innovation

Collaboration with Edinburgh funded under new scheme

A group of CRLI researchers (Curwood, Pardo, Bell) have been successful awarded funds for an international collaboration with the University of Edinburgh. 

Global engagement is one of the areas that the University of Sydney has prioritised in its 2016-2020 Strategic Plan. As part of this, new partnership collaboration awards have been set up to fund collaboration between Sydney researchers and international colleagues in leading institutions in Europe and Asia.

Three recent PhD graduates: Nanoscience, higher education, and agricultural learning

One of the most important things we do at CRLI is supporting our PhD students. A few of these have graduated in the last few months and been awarded their doctorates. Their years of hard work certainly deserve a mention, so we’ll briefly summarise their work below.

Polly Lai

Polly

Why use version control in your research project? And how, with git?

If you are not ready for this yet, you will be at some time - when you have felt the horror of loosing days if not weeks of work. But versioning is useful for less dramatic purposes as well, not only for backup. For instance, to help you understand why in the past you made certain changes, why you did a certain analysis in the way you did it. Or you simply want to undo a change in your analysis. Or because you want to keep an audit trail of your analysis. Or to share it with others. 

Versioning is different from backing-up

Versioning is not the same as backup. Of course, you are backing up your files, regularly (which means: daily at least). On a Mac, you probably use Time Machine, on Windows a similar product. And of course, the backup is made to a drive that is different from your hard drive. If possible, you hold all your critical files on Dropbox, Box, or other cloud services so that you have a copy of all your critical files, up-to-date, even if your house gets flooded or burns down.

Best article of 2016—Educational Psychologist!

Educational Psychologist is the leading academic journal for educational research. Earlier this month, they awarded the 'best article of 2016' to an article written by Michael Jacobson, Manu Kapur, and Peter Reimann.

In the second iteration of the award, the prestigious Educational Psychologist has deemed the best paper of 2016 to be Conceptualizing Debates in Learning and Educational Research: Toward a Complex Systems Conceptual Framework of Learning' (Jacobson, Kapur, Reimann, 2016)! Authors Michael Jacobson and Peter Reimann are both professors here at Sydney University—the latter being the current co-director of CRLI—and their external

Idea suggestions

Submission Form: A call for interesting ideas, projects, and research

Do you have predictions about the future of learning? Are you working on an innovative project? Itching to share insights into novel pedagogies, new technologies, interesting places and spaces, theories, methods, and other topics or combinations? We here at the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI) are trialling an initiative to gather such ideas, projects, and research from our broader community.